Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

Social Networking

December 4, 2012

Today we’re hosting librarians from around the country and talking about engaging with students.  TOTD are on stage looking at social networking, so we thought it would be a good moment to rehearse the places you can find us and why you might want to:

Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/#!/uoplibrary

The Library’s Facebook page keep you up-to-date, offers links to help, and even answers enquiries.  If you’re on Facebook, try liking us!

Google+

https://plus.google.com/105160925780437322815#105160925780437322815/posts

Our Google+ stream is a way of keeping up with the Library happenings.    Use it for up-to-the minute news, to catch our mini-competitions, or even to ask enquiries.  Join our circles!

Pinterest

http://pinterest.com/uoplib/

Collections of photos – some to do with the Library, some that are fun from around the web.  See what we’re up or see what we’re interested in!

Twitter

http://www.twitter.com/uoplibrary

The Library’s Twitter feed is a great way of keeping up with goings-on via Twitter.  Use it for up-to-the minute news, to catch our mini-competitions, or even to ask enquiries.  Follow us!

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/user/uoplibrary

Introductory and ‘how to’ videos to give you a taste of the Library.

and of course the one you already know about!

Thing of the Day

https://reden.wordpress.com

This is a blog rounding up bizarre, interesting and sometimes even useful things we find on the internet.  Send in a contribution via totd@port.ac.uk

 

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Klout

April 25, 2012

Klout is an American based company that provides social media analytics. Sounds a bit dull but what it means in practice is that they can tell you your influence on your social networks. Klout will analysis your influence and give you a score between 1 and 100 based on how influential you are. This is apparently based on ‘your ability to drive action’ – not sure what this means but we think it means getting people to engage with the content you create. Klout isn’t for everyone but if you’re using social networks to promote yourself or your business or you want to see what impact your views are having in the wider world then you may want to know what Klout you have!

http://klout.com/home

1000 addenda

October 22, 2011

OK, we’ve had complaints already that we didn’t includ ‘Hats of Meat’ our most controversial post right back in the early days that nearly had the blog shut down!  Of course, since then Lady Gaga has made us look quite prescient.  But here’s the post:

https://reden.wordpress.com/2007/10/10/hats-of-meat/

And some sharp eyed person has noticed that yesterday we had a representative post from every year of existence *except* 2010.  (Do you people not have lives?)

Just to show that we weren’t having an off year, here are three favourites from 2010:

Twitter Typos
https://reden.wordpress.com/2010/10/23/twitter-typos/

Chart Porn
https://reden.wordpress.com/2010/04/23/chart-porn/

50 Strange Buildings of the World
https://reden.wordpress.com/2009/03/10/50-strange-buildings-of-the-world/

and keen as ever not to let it be forgotten: The Zargonic Effect
https://reden.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/the-zargonic-effect/

 

Visual.ly

July 18, 2011

The infographic we posted on Friday is a good example of ‘data visualization’ that seems to be all the rage.  There are some great examples at:

http://visual.ly/

They’re not quite ready to go yet with their aim to help you create infographics, but you can already try out:

http://visual.ly/twitter

which lets you create a visual of your Twitter presence.  Or even more fun, compare two Twitter accounts in a Faceoff!

Twitter record

May 2, 2011

Twitter recorded the highest ever rate of sustained tweets during the buildup to news that Osama bin Laden was dead, as shown by this graphic.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/twitteroffice/5681263084/

Social media search engines

April 8, 2011

Library staff had an opportunity this week to hear a talk by Karen Blakeman from RBA Information Services at which she talked about some alternatives to Google. Among these were some search engines for social media. She recommended this presentation, which covers some of the best.

http://www.slideshare.net/Philbradley/onlinemasterclass-final

more infographics

March 30, 2011

After last Thursday’s Twitter and Facebook infographics, TOTD has been on the hunt for data relating to Twitter age usage and found these rather delightful examples of visual presentations of information:

http://blog.kissmetrics.com/social-media-by-demographic/?wide=1

http://www.digitalsurgeons.com/facebook-vs-twitter-infographic/

both of which are pointed to by this: http://www.liberatemedia.com/blog/which-age-ranges-are-the-most-prolific-users-of-social-networks/ which has its own graphic as well.

Twitter and Facebook infographics

March 24, 2011

TOTD was recently involved with a ‘Cafe Scientifique’ on the subject of communication via social networking services.

For the session we created these infographics which may be of interest.

infographic with March 2011 statistics on Facebook

Infographic with March 2011 statistics on Facebook

infographic with March 2011 statistics on Twitter

Infographic with March 2011 statistics on Twitter

Monitter

February 22, 2011

The current protests across the Middle East have highlighted how important social networks have become in both helping people to organise themselves and also allowings us to know what is happening in a country where offical media channels have been cut off or restricted.

Monitter is a website that works with Twitter and  allows you to enter keywords and see the tweets that contain those words in real time. You can also specify a geographical location so that you can find the tweets being made by those experiencing events on the ground.

http://www.monitter.com/

Citing Tweets

February 6, 2011

If you’d like advice on how to reference a tweet, try:

http://gunther-eysenbach.blogspot.com/2009/04/how-to-cite-twitter-how-to-cite-tweets.html

of course, whether you should be or not, we’ll  leave up to you and the tutor marking your work!